Whole Grain Stamps Issued by the Oldways Whole Grains Council Come to the Bakehouse!

6 yellow, black, and white stamps displaying an amount of whole grains

Fifteen years ago, the Oldways Whole Grains Council created the Whole Grain Stamps packaging symbol, which is now featured on more than 13,000 products in 64 countries. The impetus behind the Stamp has been to give consumers an effective search tool when seeking out authentic whole grain foods. Issued in three varieties—the 100% Stamp (left), the 50%+ Stamp (center), and the Basic Stamp (right)–the Council’s Whole Grain Stamp, at a glance, takes out all the guesswork in determining the amount of whole grains in any given food that bears it. Each variety of the Stamp features a stylized sheaf of grain on a golden-yellow background with a bold black border. The eye-catching design makes the Whole Grain Stamp easy to spot on food packages. 

As an Oldways Whole Grains Council member, the Bakehouse is excited to take part in the Council’s Whole Grain Stamp initiative. At the Bakehouse, several of our breads and pastries now feature the Council’s Whole Grain Stamps (100%, 50%+, and Basic). In an effort to make our guests’ whole-grain quest even easier, we’ve also mounted in the Bakeshop an easy-to-read display board above our bread display. It spells out what the different Whole Grain Stamps mean together with a listing of the Bakehouse breads and pastries that now proudly bear them.

100% STAMP, 50%+ STAMP OR BASIC STAMP?

Here’s the delineation of the Council’s three different Whole Grain Stamps:

2 yellow, black, and white stamps with the words "100% whole grain" on them and "wholegrainscouncil.org" vertically on the right side of the stamp

If a product bears the 100% Stamp, then all its grain ingredients are whole grain. There is a minimum requirement of 16g (16 grams) – a full serving – of whole grain per labeled serving, for products using the 100% Stamp.

2 yellow, black, and white stamps with the words "50% whole grain" on them and "wholegrainscouncil.org" vertically on the right side of the stamp

If a product bears the 50%+ Stamp, then at least half of its grain ingredients are whole grain. There is a minimum requirement of 8g (8 grams) – a half serving – of whole grain per labeled serving, for products using the 50%+ Stamp.

2 yellow, black, and white stamps with the words "whole grain" on them and "wholegrainscouncil.org" vertically on the right side of the stamp

If a product bears the Basic Stamp, it contains at least 8g (8 grams) – a half serving – of whole grain, but may contain more refined grain than whole.

The Oldways Whole Grains Council – What does this organization do?

Founded in 2003 and based in the US, the Oldways Whole Grains Council is a nonprofit advocacy group of millers, manufacturers, scientists, chefs, and bakers whose aim is to increase the awareness and consumption of whole grains for better health and optimum flavor. At the heart of its mission are initiatives that the Council pursues rigorously, which include: 

  • To clarify the definition of “whole grain,” document the health benefits of whole grains, and advocate additional whole-grain health research
  • To educate consumers about the benefits of whole grains
  • To help Americans find whole grains, with a packaging symbol, and educate them on cooking whole grains
  • To promote whole grains through a positive message about their benefits, rather than by criticizing refined grains
  • To serve as a conduit between science, industry, and consumers
  • To help grain-product companies, retailers and restaurants meet the needs of health-conscious consumers with appealing whole grain products

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After a long, established career as a Ph.D. art history scholar and art museum curator, Lee, a Michigan native, came to the Bakehouse in 2017 eager to pursue her passion for artisanal baking and to apply her love of history, research, writing, and editing in a new exciting arena. Her first turn at the Bakehouse was as a day pastry baker. She then moved on to retail sales in the Bakeshop, followed by joining the Marketing Team and becoming the Bakehouse’s designated culinary historian. In addition to her retail sales and marketing work, she’s a member of the Bakehouse’s Grain Commission, co-author and editor of the Bakehouse's series of cookbooklets, and a regular contributor to the BAKE! Blog and Zingerman’s Newsletter, where she explores the culinary, cultural, and social history and evolution of the Bakehouse’s artisan baked goods.

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